HealthESites
October 10, 2001
Vol. 2, No. 36
ISSN 1530-3608
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Bruce Maxwell, Editor - bmax@silverhammerpub.com
Silver Hammer Publishing - http://silverhammerpub.com

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The News
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SOME ADS HIT WRONG NOTE AFTER ATTACKS
The award for incredibly bad taste in post-September 11
advertising goes to a company calling itself the "United States
of America's Emergency Response Network." Within two weeks of the
attacks, some New Yorkers received a telemarketing message from
the firm that said in part: "All private citizens of New York are
vulnerable and almost totally at risk if we are attacked again by
the terrorists with chemical or biological weapons. Such a
catastrophe would make the World Trade Center tragedy seem minor
by comparison as millions of us would perish." The message urged
recipients to visit a Web site where they could allegedly get
free gas masks. The offer has since been rescinded, and the
company's exact motive remains unclear.
Source: ABCNEWS.com - Oct. 4, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/abc/20011003/bs/
wtc_advertising_011003_1.html



E-NOSE SNIFFS OUT NASTY BUGS
Students at the Illinois Institute of Technology have developed
an "electronic nose" that can detect a variety of bacteria in
blood samples. The sensing device detects bacteria much more
quickly than conventional lab tests.
Source: Wired News - Oct. 6, 2001
http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,47008,00.html


ONLINE PRACTICE GUIDELINES WERE OUT OF DATE
The federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality learned
the hard way that you can't just throw health information online
and then never look at it again. The agency had 17 clinical
practice guidelines for treating everything from cancer to
depression posted on its Web site. But a study found that 14 of
the 17 documents were out of date, with some lacking a great deal
of recent knowledge. In response to the report, the agency
quickly pulled the out-of-date documents from its Web site.
Source: American Medical News - Oct. 15, 2001
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_01/prsb1015.htm


INTERACTIVE VIDEO CAN REPLACE SOME NURSING VISITS
People needing health care at home typically are visited by
registered nurses. A Pennsylvania study suggests that some
in-home visits could be replaced by interactive video sessions
involving the nurse and patient, potentially saving time and
money without harming patient care.
Source: Reuters Health - Oct. 9, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011009/hl/visits_1.html


MEDICAL DEVICE MAKER MEDTRONIC THRIVES ON
PRODUCT INNOVATION AND WEB TRANSFORMATION
For the last 15 years, Medtronic has posted annual growth rates
in revenues and earnings that would make most companies drool.
The medical device maker hopes that moving its internal and
external business processes to the Web will help it continue the
trend.
Source: Darwin - October 2001
http://www.darwinmag.com/read/100101/heart_content.html


GROWING MEDICAL USE
OF HANDHELD COMPUTERS REPORTED
A new poll by Harris Interactive has found that 26 percent of
physicians use handheld devices. Eighteen percent of all doctors
have integrated the devices into their offices, while the
remaining eight percent use them primarily for personal
activities.
Source: American Medical News - Oct. 8, 2001
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_01/tesb1008.htm


GLAXOSMITHKLINE LEADS WAY
IN ONLINE DOCTOR PROMOS
Online meetings and presentations are becoming increasingly
important portions of the promotional blitz that pharmaceutical
firms aim at physicians. GlaxoSmithKline is the most active drug
company in the e-meetings arena, according to a recent report,
followed closely by Merck.
Source: Internet Week - Oct. 5, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/cmp/20011007/tc/
inw20011005s0001_1.html



PHYSICAL THERAPIST GIVES PRESCRIPTION FOR FITNESS
A Swedish physical therapist has placed online a 30-chapter
handbook for physicians about the importance of exercise. Now
she's trying to convince doctors to write exercise prescriptions
besides their normal pharmaceutical prescriptions.
Source: Reuters Health - Oct. 5, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011005/hl/fitness_1.html


PFIZER, IBM, MICROSOFT FORM UNIT FOR DOCS
Pfizer, IBM, and Microsoft have formed a new company to produce
software designed to automate many functions in medical offices.
The software also will connect physicians' offices with
pharmacies, insurance companies, laboratories, and other doctors.
Source: Reuters - Oct. 10, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011010/bs/
tech_pfizer_dc_1.html


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