HealthESites
October 3, 2001
Vol. 2, No. 35
ISSN 1530-3608
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Bruce Maxwell, Editor - bmax@silverhammerpub.com
Silver Hammer Publishing - http://silverhammerpub.com

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The News
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SITES GEARED TOWARD EASING ANXIETY AND PANIC
A general sense of anxiety has blanketed the country since the
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. This article describes several Web
sites aimed at helping people whose level of anxiety exceeds the
norm and interferes with their daily lives.
Source: Los Angeles Times - Oct. 1, 2001
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/
la-000078467oct01.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dhealth



WEB SITES FOUND ILLEGALLY PROMOTING
CANCER CURES
Some scientists out in California apparently got bored one day,
so they looked at a bunch of commercial Web sites that provide
information about herbs and cancer. Shock of all shocks, nearly
all the sites hawked supplements that they illegally claimed
prevented or cured cancer.
Source: Reuters Health - Oct. 2, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011002/hl/sites_1.html


WEB NEWS STILL FAILS BLIND USERS
Despite all the hype about the Web opening up the world to people
with disabilities, most news sites remain inaccessible to people
with vision impairments, according to Wired News. Wired News gets
special kudos for admitting that its own site does not conform to
all of the accessibility guidelines developed by the World Wide
Web Consortium. The article from Computers in Libraries explains
how to make Web sites accessible to people with disabilities
involving sight, hearing, or motor skills.
Sources: Wired News - Sept. 27, 2001
http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,47054,00.html
Computers in Libraries - October 2001
http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/oct01/christensen.htm


COMPUTER POST-IT NOTES AID DOCS
A computer program that reminds doctors to consider four
different preventive therapies when they treat patients in
emergency rooms and other hospital settings significantly boosts
use of the therapies, according to a study published in the New
England Journal of Medicine. The researchers noted, however, that
the reminder system needs to be immediately and easily accessible
to be used.
Source: HealthScout - Sept. 28, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010927/hl/
computer_post-it_notes_aid_docs_1.html



SMOG SPOTTING RAMPS UP DOWN UNDER
Before they venture outdoors, residents of Melbourne, Australia,
can click on a government Web site to receive constantly updated
data about local air pollution levels. The Australian Air Quality
Forecasting System also forecasts air pollution levels for the
next 24 hours. The system is particularly useful because instead
of just providing one set of data for the whole city, it offers
numbers for areas as small as one square kilometer.
Source: Wired News - Sept. 29, 2001
http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,47145,00.html


AUSTRALIA UPDATES INTERNET HEALTH PLAN
Australia's Department of Health and Aged Care has released a
second edition of its national action plan for health
information. Much of the 127-page plan focuses on managing and
delivering health information through the Internet and other
computer systems.
Source: Australia Dept. of Health and Aged Care - Sept. 19, 2001
http://www.health.gov.au/healthonline/action.htm


SURFING INSTRUCTORS: TEACHING HOW TO HANG TEN
OVER MEDICINE ON THE INTERNET
Consumer-oriented seminars about how to find health information
online are becoming increasingly common. But a California
physician is taking a different approach. He has joined with a
medical librarian and a patient advocate to teach an adult
education course about how to evaluate health information that's
found online.
Source: American Medical News - Oct. 8, 2001
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_01/tesa1008.htm


HEALTH AND THE NEW MEDIA
The July issue of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication
is devoted to the topic of health and the new media. Articles in
the issue examine online credibility, pediatric telemedicine,
telehospice projects, the e-health market, behavioral e-health,
e-health in Singapore, and telepsychiatry.
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication - July 2001
http://www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol6/issue4


EUROPE TACKLES CHRONIC PAIN
This article describes several European Web sites about chronic
pain. Most of the sites are aimed at physicians, but some of the
information they provide may also be useful to consumers.
Source: The Lancet - Sept. 29, 2001
http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol358/Iss9287/full/
llan.358.9287.dissecting_room.17787.1


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