HealthESites
May 31, 2000
Vol. 1, No. 7
ISSN 1530-3608
______________________________________________________


Bruce Maxwell, Editor <bmax@silverhammerpub.com>
Silver Hammer Publishing <http://silverhammerpub.com>

Instructions for subscribing and unsubscribing are provided at
the end of this newsletter.


The News
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ORIGINAL REPORT: SPAMMING FOR DIABETES
Just about everyone with an e-mail account gets constant spam
hawking Viagra and other prescription drugs, diet pills,
vitamins, and so on. But one that your editor received today is
different: It seeks to recruit subjects for an alleged diabetes
research study. The e-mail claims that a company called
eResearchOnline.com is conducting a "scientific study" about
stress and diabetes "in conjunction with adherence to your
diabetes treatment regimen" (I don't have diabetes). Folks who
qualify for the study have to fill out several psychological
questionnaires and undergo blood analysis. People who want to
qualify are instructed to visit the company's Web site to fill
out an initial survey. That's where things get really
interesting. The Web site has only one page, which is a detailed
survey seeking a whole lot of very personal information: name,
telephone number, address, age, height, weight, ethnicity,
insulin type taken, blood sugar levels, and symptoms, among other
details. The page has no contact information, no information
about the company, no description of the alleged study, and no
privacy policy. At the top it says: "We apologize that our main
web site is under construction, it will be up soon, and will
conatin (sic) details about our other research studies."
According to registration records, the site was registered May 8
and the contact is a person in Hialeah, Florida. How many red
flags can you count on this one?


ETHICS CODE FOR CONSUMER HEALTH WEB SITES
UNVEILED
The Internet Healthcare Coalition has released an ethics code for
health Web sites aimed at consumers. The new document comes only
weeks after Health Internet Ethics, an industry group, released
its own ethics code (see HealthESites May 10, 2000).
Source: Reuters - May 24, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000524/hl/www_ethics_1.html
Internet Healthcare Coalition ethics code:
http://www.ihealthcoalition.org/ethics/code0524.pdf


NEW LAWS SOUGHT ON WEB PHARMACIES
A parade of Clinton administration officials appearing before a
congressional subcommittee said they need new laws and more money
to regulate Internet pharmacies. Earlier this month, the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration submitted regulatory legislation
that Congress is now considering.
Source: Associated Press - May 25, 2000
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/000525/19/internet-drugs


DISABILITIES COMMUNITY GETS ITS OWN PORTAL AND MORE
This article examines the launch and prospects of CanDo.com, a
new Web portal for people with disabilities. The site hopes to
compete based on its content, community, and 20,000-item catalog
of disability products.
Source: San Jose Mercury News - May 29, 2000
http://www.mercurycenter.com/business/top/011894.htm


ONLINE THERAPY ISN'T SHRINKING
An estimated 300 Web sites now offer some sort of online
counseling or therapy. But many psychiatrists say the technology
is moving far faster than any guidelines or standards for using
it responsibly.
Source: Wired News - May 30, 2000
http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,36584,00.html


PHYSICIANS NOW FACE A WEALTH OF CLINICAL
INFORMATION ONLINE
Patients aren't the only ones finding a wealth of medical
information online. Medical schools such as Stanford and
commercial firms are racing to put clinical information online
for doctors, many of whom have not previously been fans of the
Internet.
Source: New York Times - May 30, 2000
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/05/biztech/articles/
30visit.html



MIGHTY CYBERENGINES SPEW HEALTH MYTHS
Urban myths about health topics used to spread fairly slowly,
usually from person to person. The Internet has changed that,
allowing wild tales to spread worldwide. Jane Brody of the New
York Times looks at some of the most common health myths now
circulating online.
Source: New York Times - May 30, 2000
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/health/
053000hth-brody.html



The Sites
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ASK NOAH: GENETIC DISORDERS, KIDNEY AND UROLOGIC
DISEASES
Genetic disorders:
http://www.noah.cuny.edu/genetic_diseases/geneticdis.html
Kidney and urologic diseases:
http://www.noah.cuny.edu/gastro/kidney.html
Ask NOAH, which is one of the finest health sites on the
Internet, has recently added pages about genetic disorders and
about kidney and urologic diseases. The pages, like others at
NOAH, provide links to selected sites and publications about
their respective topics, all carefully chosen by librarians and
other specialists in medical information.


MEDLINEplus: AFRICAN AMERICAN HEALTH, ASIAN
AMERICAN HEALTH, HISPANIC AMERICAN HEALTH,
NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH, MEDICARE
African American Health:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/africanamericanhealth.html
Asian American Health:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/asianamericanhealth.html
Hispanic American Health:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hispanicamericanhealth.html
Native American Health:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/nativeamericanhealth.html
Medicare:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/medicare.html
The National Library of Medicine has added a number of pages to
its MEDLINEplus site. Each topical page has links to selected
publications from the National Cancer Institute, the National
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Diabetes
Information Clearinghouse, the NIH Office of Research on Minority
Health, the College of American Pathologists, the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, the American Lung Association,
and the National Women's Health Information Center, among other
organizations.


A Quick Plug
______________________________________________________

Congressional Quarterly has just published my book, "How to Track
Politics on the Internet," which describes more than 600 of the
best political Web sites, newsgroups, and mailing lists. The book
costs $29.95, and can be ordered from CQ (800-638-1710) or any
online bookstore. The table of contents and introduction are
available at http://bmaxwell.home.mindspring.com
______________________________________________________

Copyright 2000 Silver Hammer Publishing. All rights reserved
worldwide. Please feel free to forward this newsletter to anyone
who might be interested, as long as you forward the entire
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If you like this newsletter, you might like my others as well:
Health Newsbrief, Women's Health Newsbrief, Men's Health
Newsbrief, and PoliSites. Subscription info at
http://silverhammerpub.com

Bruce Maxwell
Silver Hammer Publishing
6937 Custis Parkway
Falls Church, VA 22042
703-532-6327
bmax@silverhammerpub.com


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