Health Newsbrief
October 4, 2000
Vol. 1, No. 19
ISSN 1530-3616
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Bruce Maxwell, Editor <bmax@silverhammerpub.com>
Silver Hammer Publishing <http://silverhammerpub.com>

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The News
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ALZHEIMER'S VACCINE PROVES SUCCESSFUL IN MICE
A vaccine administered through the nose may be able to reduce the
buildup of brain plaques that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's
disease. Writing in the Annals of Neurology, researchers from
Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston said the vaccine reduced
plaque buildup in mice by up to 60 percent. They expect to start
clinical trials with humans next year.
Source: Reuters Health - Sept. 28, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000928/hl/alzheimers_4.html


THE CHALLENGE OF DEPRESSION IN LATE LIFE
This editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association
looks at some of the difficulties in diagnosing and treating
depression in older adults, especially those whose symptoms do
not fully meet the criteria for a major depressive disorder.
Source: JAMA - Sept. 27, 2000
http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/current/ffull/jed00066.html


MULTIVITAMINS CAN GIVE YOU THE EDGE
A study published in the Journal of the American College of
Nutrition suggests that all adults should take multivitamins -
even those who eat a healthy diet that includes lots of fruits
and vegetables. In the study, adults who took multivitamins
experienced an increase in blood levels of several vitamins and
minerals. The increases were significant enough to reduce the
risks of problems such as heart disease and osteoporosis.
Source: HealthSCOUT - Sept. 29, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20000929/hl/
multivitamins_can_give_you_the_edge_2.html



NEW DRUG HELPS COLORECTAL CANCER
Patients in the final stage of colorectal cancer can live
slightly longer and reduce the number of drug-related side
effects if they combine a new drug with the two standard ones,
according to a study published in the New England Journal of
Medicine. The drug is irinotecan, also known as Camptosar. Now
researchers are studying whether patients in earlier stages of
colorectal cancer might benefit from the drug.
Source: Associated Press - Sept. 27, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20000927/hl/
colorectal_cancer_1.html



HEALTH CARE ISSUES HEATING UP STATE BALLOT
INITIATIVES
More than 200 initiatives will appear on state ballots in
November, and health care is one of the top subjects. For
example, three states have initiatives about spending tobacco
settlement money on health care, and in three others voters will
decide whether to legalize the medical use of marijuana.
Source: American Medical News - Oct. 9, 2000
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_00/gvsd1009.htm


TOO MANY BRAIN CELLS MEAN MOOD DISORDER
People who suffer from bipolar disorder have 30 percent more
cells in two major areas of the brain that are crucial to
communication between brain cells, according to a study published
in the American Journal of Psychiatry. The disorder, previously
known as manic-depressive disorder, results in wild mood swings
between mania and depression. The researchers suggested that the
extra cells may overstimulate the brains of those with bipolar
disorder.
Source: HealthSCOUT - Oct. 3, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20001003/hl/
too_many_brain_cells_mean_mood_disorder_1.html



GARLIC: CASE UNCLOSED
Claims that garlic does everything from lowering cholesterol to
preventing heart attacks and cancer are far from proven,
according to this article in the Nutrition Action Healthletter.
The newsletter is published by the Center for Science in the
Public Internet in Washington, D.C.
Source: Nutrition Action Healthletter - October 2000
http://www.nutritionaction.com/nah/10_00/garlic.html


TARGETING TUMORS
The two common treatments for cancer - chemotherapy and radiation
- are excellent at killing cancer cells, but often cause problems
because they kill lots of good cells, too. Now doctors are
zeroing in on treatments that directly target tumors and leave
surrounding cells alone.
Source: U.S. News & World Report - Oct. 2, 2000
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/001002/cancer.htm


MAGNETIC HEADBANGERS
It sounds crazy: waving an electrified, magnetic paddle over a
patient's head to treat schizophrenia, depression, and other
psychiatric disorders. But respected doctors at places like
Columbia University and Yale are experimenting with the
procedure. Whether the treatment, called transcranial magnetic
stimulation, turns out to be a breakthrough or just hocus pocus
remains to be determined.
Source: Salon - Oct. 3, 2000
http://www.salon.com/health/feature/2000/10/03/tms


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Silver Hammer Publishing
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