Health Newsbrief
November 29, 2000
Vol. 1, No. 26
ISSN 1530-3616
______________________________________________________


Bruce Maxwell, Editor - bmax@silverhammerpub.com
Silver Hammer Publishing - http://silverhammerpub.com

Instructions for subscribing and unsubscribing are provided at
the end of this newsletter.


The News
______________________________________________________

FOR BUSY PEOPLE, STAYING FIT IS POSSIBLE
Don't have time for a long workout at the gym? Some experts say
that bite-size exercise sessions as short as 10 minutes each at
home or in the office can be highly effective in lowering weight
and improving fitness. The catch: you have to do enough of them
to equal a full workout.
Source: Washington Post - Nov. 27, 2000
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61809-2000Nov27.html


DOCTOR MAIN VARIABLE IN MASTECTOMY CHOICE
Some old-school doctors favor mastectomy for women with small
breast tumors, while other doctors prefer lumpectomy, or surgery
that only removes the tumor. Which type of doctor a woman ends up
with largely determines which kind of surgery she receives,
according to a study reported at the annual meeting of the
Radiological Society of North America.
Source: Agence France-Presse - Nov. 28, 2000
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/28/science/28BREA.html


GULP! VITAMIN FACTS
This article presents guidelines for taking vitamins and
minerals, all the while cautioning that they aren't a substitute
for eating a healthy diet. A series of accompanying charts
provide detailed facts about 19 specific vitamins and minerals.
Source: Washington Post - Nov. 28, 2000
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62348-2000Nov27.html


DIPPING INTO THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
Doctors and scientists have been trying to slow down or stop the
aging process in humans since the 1930s. They may be getting
closer to achieving their goal, although the field also has more
than its fair share of hucksters.
Source: American Medical News - Nov. 27, 2000
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_00/hlsa1204.htm


SURVEY OF PATIENTS SHOWS THAT CANCER PAIN STILL UNDERTREATED
Doctors frequently fail to properly manage pain in cancer
patients, according to a survey of patients in the United
Kingdom. More than half were not warned to expect pain, according
to the survey, and more than a third said their doctors gave them
insufficient information about pain control.
Source: British Medical Journal - Nov. 25, 2000
http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/321/7272/1309/b


SCIENTISTS MAKE A BACTERIA-SIZE MACHINE WORK
Scientists at Cornell University have created a tiny motor a few
billionths of a meter in size and made it spin around an equally
small propeller. They're not building airplanes for dust specks,
though. Instead, the researchers eventually hope to build tiny
robots that can zoom through the body, doing everything from
creating medicines to attacking cancer cells.
Source: New York Times - Nov. 25, 2000
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/25/science/25NANO.html


NJ MANDATES ANNUAL MEDICAL 'TUNEUP'
A New Jersey law that's believed to be the first of its kind in
the nation is requiring HMOs and health insurers to provide free
annual physicals to millions of state residents. People age 20
and over qualify for the program, which requires insurers to pay
for annual tests to detect cancer, diabetes, heart disease,
anemia, and glaucoma. The annual exam also includes counseling by
physicians or nurse practitioners on topics such as weight
control, along with a consultation where patients can discuss any
health concerns. Backers of the law hope it will serve as a model
for the entire country.
Source: Associated Press - Nov. 24, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20001124/us/
physicals_required_1.html

Sidebar: http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20001124/us/
physicals_required_glance_1.html



BRACES HELP ATHLETES AVOID ANKLE SPRAINS
Taping or bracing ankles before athletic activity can
significantly lower the risk of suffering an ankle sprain,
according to a study published in the Clinical Journal of Sports
Medicine. Taping or bracing also can reduce the severity of
sprains that occur. The authors suggested, though, that bracing
may be more effective than taping in protecting ankles.
Source: Reuters Health - Nov. 27, 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001127/hl/sports_injury_1.html


Will You Do Me a Favor?
______________________________________________________

If you find this newsletter useful, will you please forward it to
your friends, relatives, or colleagues who might like it? This is
the best way for me to gain subscribers so I can continue
publishing this free resource. Thanks very much for your support.
______________________________________________________

Copyright 2000 Silver Hammer Publishing. All rights reserved
worldwide. Please feel free to forward this newsletter to anyone
who might be interested, as long as you forward the entire
publication. However, it is expressly forbidden to post this
newsletter on any Web site or other electronic retrieval system.

To subscribe to Health Newsbrief, send a blank e-mail to
join-healthnews@lists.silverhammerpub.com or visit the Web site.

Health Newsbrief Web page - http://silverhammerpub.com/hn.html
Advertising information - http://silverhammerpub.com/ad.html

Like this newsletter? Then subscribe to its sister newsletter,
HealthESites, which summarizes the latest news about health
information on the Internet and how the Internet is being used in
healthcare. Subscription info at http://silverhammerpub.com

Bruce Maxwell
Silver Hammer Publishing
6937 Custis Parkway
Falls Church, VA 22042
703-532-6327
bmax@silverhammerpub.com

 

Health Newsbrief Archive

Health Newsbrief Main Page

Home