Health Newsbrief
January 10, 2001
Vol. 2, No. 1
ISSN 1530-3616
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Bruce Maxwell, Editor - bmax@silverhammerpub.com
Silver Hammer Publishing - http://silverhammerpub.com

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The News
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HOSPITAL EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT CAPACITY
MAY BE REACHING ITS LIMITS
In yet another example that the American hospital system is
collapsing around us, American Medical News reports that
emergency rooms are approaching gridlock around the country. The
problem has many causes, one of which is that hospitals don't
have enough staffed acute care beds, so patients get stacked up
in the ER with nowhere to go. One doctor quoted in the article
compares the situation to "trying to run O'Hare's air traffic
control with tin cans and string."
Source: American Medical News - Jan. 15, 2001
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_01/hlsa0115.htm


HARRIED DOCTORS TRY TO EASE BIG DELAYS AND
RUSHED VISITS
Few things make patients madder than being forced to wait forever
to see a doctor and then getting rushed through their appointment
when they finally reach an examining room. Now some doctors are
experimenting with scheduling plans and other approaches designed
to solve the problems.
Source: New York Times - Jan. 4, 2001
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/04/science/04DOCS.html


DRUG SHORTAGES BECOME WORRY AT HOSPITALS AROUND
THE COUNTRY
Hospitals around the United States are experiencing ongoing
shortages of critical drugs. The reasons are many. Isn't it odd,
though, that the drugs in shortest supply are the cheap generics,
while expensive drugs remain plentiful?
Source: New York Times - Jan. 3, 2001
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/03/business/03SHOR.html


WHEN THE HOSPITAL STAFF ISN'T ENOUGH
Hospitals are so short staffed these days that a growing number
of patients are hiring their own nurses to ensure they receive an
adequate level of care. At least some of those hiring nurses are
medical professionals themselves, a frightening commentary on the
state of American hospitals.
Source: Washington Post - Jan. 7, 2001
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A27485-2001Jan6.html


WHEN GOOD DRUGS DO HARM
Bad reactions to prescription drugs kill more Americans annually
than die on the nation's highways. One way to protect yourself is
to be very wary of any just-released drug that your doctor may
prescribe. The sidebar provides other tips for limiting your
risk.
Source: Los Angeles Times - Jan. 8, 2001
http://www.latimes.com/health/20010108/t000001967.html
Sidebar: http://www.latimes.com/health/20010108/t000001968.html


EXERCISE HOLDS KEY TO FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
This article is another retelling of the old story: If you want
to live longer, you have to exercise. It's best if you start
young, but even those of us of a certain age can benefit from
starting to exercise.
Source: Boston Globe - Jan. 2, 2001
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/002/science/
Exercise_holds_key_to_fountain_of_youth+.shtml



FDA TO ISSUE RULE BEEFING UP DRUG REPORTING
STANDARDS
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to issue a new
rule that would force drug manufacturers to increase their
monitoring and reporting of adverse reactions to their products.
Under the rule, drug makers will have to issue regular safety
reports.
Source: Reuters Health - Jan. 8, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010108/hl/
drugs_reactions_1.html



DIABETES, HYPERTENSION ERODE MENTAL AGILITY
People who have adult-onset diabetes or hypertension suffer
greater mental decline than their healthy counterparts, according
to a study published in the journal Neurology. The additional
decline is small, but doctors said it could be significant when
added to the normal declines commonly associated with aging.
Source: HealthScout - Jan. 9, 2001
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010109/hl/
diabetes_hypertension_erode_mental_agility_1.html



WITH DIETARY SALT, WHAT 'EVERYONE KNOWS'
IS IN DISPUTE
Amid all the seemingly endless changes in dietary
recommendations, you thought the recommendation to cut back on
salt was set in stone, didn't you? Not quite.
Source: New York Times - Jan. 9, 2001
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/09/health/09SALT.html


MOST DIETS WORK, BUT NOT FOR LONG
The U.S. government has looked at a wide range of diet plans, and
found that all can help people lose weight. The trick is keeping
the weight off, and the feds say that diets with moderate levels
of fat and high levels of carbohydrates work best.
Source: Washington Post - Jan. 10, 2001
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/nation/health/
A38612-2001Jan9.html



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Bruce Maxwell
Silver Hammer Publishing
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Falls Church, VA 22042
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